This ‘Arrested Development’ interview in which the male cast members mansplain and gaslight Jessica Walter is a perfect illustration of the whole fucking problem

God damn it. GOD DAMN IT. Y’ALL ARE SUPPOSED TO BE THE GOOD GUYS. 

As I’m sure you’ve heard about now, the cast of Arrested Development did an interview with The New York Times together, and things took a terrible turn when they asked about The Hollywood Reporter interview Jeffrey Tambor gave recently where he admitted to yelling at Jessica Walter. In the Times interview, Walter becomes teary and says that no one in her 60 years in show business had ever yelled at her that way, and that’s when Jason Bateman, David Cross, and even Tony Hale step in to mansplain to her that’s just how show business works.

IT IS REALLY SHITTY:

From the Hollywood Reporter interview, you talked about how you yelled at directors, assistant directors, the “Transparent” creator Jill Soloway. You even said at one point you lashed out at —

WALTER Jessica Walter.

[LAUGHTER]

BATEMAN Which we’ve all done, by the way.

WALTER Oh! You’ve never yelled at me.

BATEMAN Not to belittle what happened.

WALTER You’ve never yelled at me like that.

BATEMAN But this is a family and families, you know, have love, laughter, arguments — again, not to belittle it, but a lot of stuff happens in 15 years. I know nothing about “Transparent” but I do know a lot about “Arrested Development.” And I can say that no matter what anybody in this room has ever done — and we’ve all done a lot, with each other, for each other, against each other — I wouldn’t trade it for the world and I have zero complaints.

ARNETT I can say that I keyed Bateman’s car. I never admitted that. Because I was like, look at this guy, taking up a spot and a half.

 

CROSS You know, one thing that Jeffrey has said a number of times that I think is important, that you don’t often hear from somebody in his position, is that he learned from the experience and he’s listening and learning and growing. That’s important to remember.

WALTER [TO THE TIMES] What was your point about that, though?

If someone approached you and said, “O.K., here’s an actor that admits he routinely yells at directors, at assistant directors, at co-workers, assistants,” would you hire that person?

 

TAMBOR I would hire that person if that person said, you know, “I’ve reckoned with this.”

And you feel like you have?

TAMBOR And I have, and am continuing to do. And I profusely have apologized. Ms. Walter is indeed a walking acting lesson. And on “Transparent,” you know, I had a temper and I yelled at people and I hurt people’s feelings. And that’s unconscionable, and I’m working on it and I’m going to put that behind me, and I love acting.

 

BATEMAN Again, not to belittle it or excuse it or anything, but in the entertainment industry it is incredibly common to have people who are, in quotes, “difficult.” And when you’re in a privileged position to hire people, or have an influence in who does get hired, you make phone calls. And you say, “Hey, so I’ve heard X about person Y, tell me about that.” And what you learn is context. And you learn about character and you learn about work habits, work ethics, and you start to understand. Because it’s a very amorphous process, this sort of [expletive] that we do, you know, making up fake life. It’s a weird thing, and it is a breeding ground for atypical behavior and certain people have certain processes.

SHAWKAT But that doesn’t mean it’s acceptable. And the point is that things are changing, and people need to respect each other differently.

WALTER [THROUGH TEARS] Let me just say one thing that I just realized in this conversation. I have to let go of being angry at him. He never crossed the line on our show, with any, you know, sexual whatever. Verbally, yes, he harassed me, but he did apologize. I have to let it go. [Turns to Tambor.] And I have to give you a chance to, you know, for us to be friends again.

TAMBOR Absolutely.

WALTER But it’s hard because honestly — Jason says this happens all the time. In like almost 60 years of working, I’ve never had anybody yell at me like that on a set. And it’s hard to deal with, but I’m over it now. I just let it go right here, for The New York Times.

BATEMAN She didn’t give it up for anybody else.

HALE But I will say, to Jason’s point, we can be honest about the fact that — and not to build a thing — we’ve all had moments.

WALTER But not like that, not like that. That was bad.

HALE Not like that. But I’m saying we’ve worked together 15 years, there has been other points of anger coming out.

BATEMAN Exactly. Again, there is context. What we do for a living is not normal, and therefore the process is not normal sometimes, and to expect it to be normal is to not understand what happens on set. Again, not to excuse it, Alia, but to be surprised by people having a wobbly route to their goal, their process — it’s very rarely predictable. All I can say, personally, is I have never learned more from an actor that I’ve worked with than Jeffrey Tambor. And I consider him one of my favorite, most valued people in my life.

CROSS I agree with everybody. And I think it’s important to note — and it hasn’t been noted — that this kind of behavior that’s being described, it didn’t just come out of the blue. It wasn’t zero to 60. There is a cumulative effect sometimes.

BATEMAN You have different people’s processes that converge and collide at times. So Jeffrey is not just popping off, coming out of his car and some unhinged guy.

CROSS That’s what I’m trying to say.

BATEMAN Not to say that you know, you [Walter] had it coming. But this is not in a vacuum — families come together and certain dynamics collide and clash every once in a while. And there’s all kinds of things that go into the stew so it’s a little narrow to single that one particular thing that is getting attention from our show.

WALTER Only because you brought it up, Jeffrey, in that article! I never would have brought it up.

BATEMAN I didn’t mean to speak for you. That was part of his process of being as contrite and as transparent as he felt like he could and should be, and wanted to at the time.

I’ll be the first to admit that I have no idea what it’s like to be on a set. I’ve never been on one. But it seems like Jason is saying that this is part of the process. But that’s not what you’re saying, Jessica.

WALTER That’s correct.

I realize this is an awkward question to ask with Jeffrey in the room. But do you have reservations about working with him again?

WALTER Of course not. No. I’ve just given it up. And you know, there’s something really, really freeing about that now. I realize that. I don’t want to walk around with anger. I respect him as an actor. We’ve known each other for years and years and years. No, no, no, no. Of course, I would work with him again in a heartbeat.

Oh, and here’s audio in case you’re not horrified enough:

For starters, how dare Jason Bateman try to tell Jessica Walter what her experience was. She was clearly left shaken by whatever happened, and for him to belittle it — despite his insistence that he wasn’t belittling it — is just a textbook example of male presumption that somehow they are the sole arbiters of objective truth and reality.

Second of all, for these men to just shrug that this is the way showbusiness operates IS EXACTLY THE FUCKING PROBLEM. YOU ARE DESCRIBING IT. People (men) losing their temper and yelling at their fellow workers is not acceptable — it shouldn’t be acceptable in any line of work — and other men witnessing this and dismissing it instead of confronting it and changing it is what perpetuates the status quo. I understand that this interview and questions about Tambor and Walter’s emotion probably made Bateman, Cross, and Hale uncomfortable and want to fix things, and smooth things over by suggesting that it really wasn’t that bad, but shame on them for being cowards. Shame on them for wanting to make Tambor more comfortable WHILE JESSICA WALTER IS SITTING RIGHT THERE AND CRYING. FUCK.

But good on you, Alia Shawkat, for being brave enough to call out this bullshit when your male co-stars refused to. Women have to have each others’ backs when men won’t.

Jason Bateman and Tony Hale have since apologized on Twitter.

Men: try harder, be better. Oh, and WE’RE WAITING, DAVID CROSS.

Here is an excellent piece about the “cultural vandalism” of men like Tambor and Cosby and Spacey, tainting everything they touch.

Oh, and after Amazon refused to do so, Tambor has been submitted for Emmy consideration by Netflix.

More #MeToo

Morgan Freeman has been accused of sexual harassment by eight women. Freeman has issued an apology.

Moses Farrow has written a long and personal defense of Woody Allen against the accusations that he molested his sister Dylan. It’s a difficult read with some explosive allegations against Mia Farrow, and I don’t know that it sheds any real light on what happened — I think ultimately your takeaway will depend on your presumptions about this case. The only thing that is certain is that everyone is this story is broken in some way, and the whole situation is profoundly sad.

Nicole Eggert’s case against Scott Baio will not be going forward because of statutes of limitations.

Harvey Weinstein, however, is being investigated by the feds.

Former Bachelorette Meredith Phillips has accused a female masseuse the show hired to help her relax of drugging and sexually assaulting her.

This is a wonderful Hollywood Reporter roundtable discussion with some of the best female actresses on television right now, talking about pay disparities, nudity, racism and “sexiness.”

Rebecca Corry, one of the women who stepped forward to speak out about Louis C.K., explains her decision, how it changed her life — not for the better, and why she doesn’t regret it.

Sarah Silverman has some complicated feelings about some men accused of sexual harassment, namely Louis C.K., Aziz Ansari and Al Franken.

Related: Carmen Esposito talks about finding a place for the #MeToo movement and rape jokes in comedy.

13 Reasons Why almost cut a powerful #MeToo scene in which the female characters give testimony about their own sexual harassment, but then the show’s female executives stepped up and made sure it stayed in. In a similar situation, Maggie Gyllenhaal fought to keep a female masturbation scene in The Deuce. THIS IS WHY YOU NEED TO INCLUDE FEMALE VOICES.

The number of female writers in British TV and film is at “abjectly low levels.” I shudder to think what it must be over here.

In Trump and NFL News

Jesus Christ, I hate writing about the NFL. I hate the sport, I hate that it takes such a violent toll on its players, I hate the culture of toxic masculinity it encourages, I hate the way the NFL treats its cheerleaders, I hate the way the NFL’s white billionaire owners hold cities hostage demanding corporate welfare, I love J.J. Watt — he’s a good egg, but I pretty much hate everything else about the NFL.

And I especially hate that the league, in an attempt to make everyone happy, but will make no one happy, has adopted new rules demanding that players stand during the National Anthem or stay in the locker room. While the NFL as a business has the right to expect and demand certain behaviors from their employees, I can not think of anything less American than mandated patriotism. This guy — a former football writer — sums up my feelings about all of this (I mean, aside from the part where he loves the sport. Let the record show, I have always hated the sport.).

But the ultimate punchline to all of this is that the NFL’s new policies will not placate the one person it was designed to: Donald JesusFuckingChrist Trump. And in fact, right on cue, he made this alarming statement this morning about the policy:

“Maybe they shouldn’t be in the country.”

I just can not get over how appalling this statement is, and how revealing it is of Trump’s racism, how inherently suspicious he is of African-Americans as “real” Americans. It shouldn’t be that surprising to me, after all, his birtherism is an extension of this attitude. And yet, every time I think this disgusting human being couldn’t be more disgusting, he goes and out-disgustings himself.

Oh, and also?

Fuck you, Mike Pence. Fuck right off.

Meanwhile, a judge has ruled that Trump banning Twitter users violates the Constitution, so HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA, YOU GOTTA SUCK IT UP, BUTTERCUP.

In Other TV News

TMZ has a photo of Becca the Bachelorette kissing someone at what looks an awful lot like the finale. Don’t click if you don’t want to be spoiled — though, honestly, I couldn’t figure out who he was even after consulting my post with all their photos. I mean, we can narrow down the possibilities, but it’s still pretty unclear.

By the way, Becca is as tired of her stupid catchphrase as you are.

Meanwhile, if you care, Needledick and Lauren #Whatever are getting married in Hawaii and not on TV.

GOD DAMMIT, GEORGE, GO FINISH THE BOOKS.

Y’all gotta stop talking about a Parks and Rec reboot unless you’re going to promise me a Parks and Rec reboot.

Speaking of, The Middle hasn’t been off the air for a full week and they’re already talking about a reboot.

Beginning on May 29, there will be a 500-episode Doctor Who marathon on Twitch.

The Fosters spinoff will be called Good Trouble.

This is a very nice tribute to Phoebe Waller-Bridge.

Cancellations

In Development

Casting News

Mark Your Calendars

R.I.P.

Richard “Dick” Goodwin, Legendary speechwriter for Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson among others. He also was the lead investigator in the Quiz Show scandal.

WATCH THIS

The Last Days of Michael Jackson: Pretty much exactly what it sounds like. 7 p.m., ABC

Terrence Howard’s Fright Club: Terrence Howard’s biggest fans are invited to meet him in an elaborate prank. OK, but Terence Howards has “biggest fans?” 7 p.m., Fox

Red Nose Day: Julia Roberts, Ed Sheeran and Kelly Clarkson are among the stars participating in this fund raiser for children’s issues. 9 p.m., NBC

Siren: Season finale. 7 p.m., Freeform

Late Night: Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon: Cate Blanchett, Guy Fieri, Darius Rucker Late Night with Seth Meyers: Mindy Kaling, Ellie Kemper, Liz Garbus, Steven Wolf The Late Show with Stephen Colbert: Anne Hathaway, David Sedaris, Ahmed Bharoocha The Late Late Show with James Corden: Ted Danson, Natalie Dormer, Jessie J Jimmy Kimmel Live: Samantha Bee, Dylan Minnette, Anderson.Paak Conan: Anthony Joshua, Lake Street Dive Watch What Happens Live: Laurie Metcalf, Paul Bettany

 

THURS 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30
ABC The Last Days of Michael Jackson
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What Would YOu do?
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CBS The Big Bang Theory
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Young Sheldon
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Mom
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Life in Pieces
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S.W.A.T.
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CW Supernatural
(repeat)
Black Lightning
(repeat)
News/Local
FOX Terrence Howard’s Fright Club
(new)
Showtime at the Apollo
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News/Local
NBC American Ninja Warrior
(new)
Hollywood Game Night
(new)
Red Nose Day
(new)
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